International Journal of Medical Anesthesiology
  • Printed Journal
  • Refereed Journal
  • Peer Reviewed Journal
P-ISSN: 2664-3766
E-ISSN: 2664-3774
Journal is inviting manuscripts for its coming issue. Contact us for more details.

International Journal of Medical Anesthesiology

2021, Vol. 4, Issue 4, Part B
Effect of dexmedetomidine by nebulizer for blunting stress response to direct laryngoscopy and intubation


Author(s): Dr. Pranav A Sheth, Dr. Hetal Hathiwala and Dr. Divyang Shah

Abstract:
Introduction: Direct laryngoscopy and intubation are noxious stimuli and are associated with transient, unpredictable and variable hemodynamic changes. Dexmedetomidine has the potential to produce bradycardia and hypotension when administered as a bolus; in a way to solve this problem, nebulization route chosen. Nebulized dexmedetomidine has a bioavailability of 65%. Nebulized drug preferred over intranasal administration to avoids adverse effects.
Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study to evaluate the role of nebulized dexmedetomidine as a premedication in attenuating the stress response to laryngoscopy and intubation along with any adverse effects of drug.
Materials and Methods: 50 patients of ASA grade I and II elective surgery undergoing general anesthesia were randomly divided in two groups N and D, who received nebulized normal saline(5ml) and nebulized dexmedetomidine (1ug/kg diluted in 5ml NS) respectively with a nebulizer face mask for 10 min before induction of anesthesia in sitting position.
Result: Following laryngoscopy and intubation, stress response markedly increased in the group N where stress response markedly decreases in group D.
Conclusions: Nebulized dexmedetomidine effectively blunts the stress response to laryngoscopy and intubation with no adverse effects.


DOI: 10.33545/26643766.2021.v4.i4b.326

Pages: 76-80 | Views: 64 | Downloads: 28

Download Full Article: Click Here
How to cite this article:
Dr. Pranav A Sheth, Dr. Hetal Hathiwala, Dr. Divyang Shah. Effect of dexmedetomidine by nebulizer for blunting stress response to direct laryngoscopy and intubation. Int J Med Anesthesiology 2021;4(4):76-80. DOI: 10.33545/26643766.2021.v4.i4b.326
International Journal of Medical Anesthesiology